What is Hemp?

There is an urban legend that the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence were written on hemp paper. This is not true. The documents housed in the National Archives were written on parchment, which is treated animal skin, typically sheepskin. According to the Library of Congress, analysis by paper conservators has determined that the paper that Thomas Jefferson used for his draft of the Declaration is mostly likely Dutch in origin. While hemp was commonly used to make paper in Southern Europe during this time, the Dutch were much more likely to use flax or linen rags.

Restriction in the United States began in 1937, according to the Hemp Industries Association. Taxing and licensing regulations made it hard for farmers to grow hemp.

During World War II, the lack of available abaca and jute prompted the government to start pro-hemp farming campaigns, including a video called “Hemp for Victory,” to meet the Navy’s demand for rope. Hemp demand fell after WWII and government restriction on the plant resumed.

FK – I know what my favorite use would be, that would involve 3-5 million patriots going to the District of Commie criminals and doing what will be required.

FK – Yeah, the cordage thing, we need lots of that now.

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